Research

The online home of our growing oral history interview collection.

Oral History

Our online award-winning oral history collection consists of more than 350 interviews. They are arranged alphabetically by last name under individual Alpha headings below: A, B, C, etc.  The interviews feature photographs of most interviewees, an interview description, downloadable interview transcripts, and audio files that can be streamed or downloaded. In 2007 we received the Texas Oral History Association's Mary Faye Barnes Award for Excellence in Community History Projects.

M

Malanders, Jessie

November 18, 1987

Interview 118a : In this interview with John Hernandez, Jessie Malanders recalls growing up in Diboll, going to school, and living through the Great Depression. He also gives his opinions on World War II, Vietnam, and the state of the world in 1987.

Malanders, Joe

November 12, 1987

Interview 114a: Joe M. Malanders recalls his memories of childhood and the Great Depression in this interview with Jorge Martinez.  Mr. Malanders remembers working hard as a child, with few toys or opportunities for play.  During the Depression he worked hard to support himself.  Mr. Malanders is not hopeful when looking into the economic future.

Malone, Vena

Malone, Vena

May 21, 1982

Interview 15a : In this interview with her granddaughter, Becky Bailey, Vena Malone reminisces about her life in East Texas. She moved from town to town her whole life, first as a child after the death of her mother and the death of her father in the 1918 flu epidemic, and then as a wife married to a lumber grader. She recalls the Depression, having a garden, canning, and eating armadillos.

Mann, Roy P.

November 17, 1987

Interview 115a : In this interview with Tina McClendon, Roy P. Mann reminisces about the Great Depression. Mr. Mann recalls working in the fields, hunting, and making wooden tools to support his family during the depression. He speculates that a new depression would be worse because modern workers wouldn't know how to support themselves without a corporate job.

Mark, Cleveland

Mark, Cleveland

September 04, 2014

268a: In this interview with Jonathan Gerland, Cleveland Mark discusses growing up in the Trinity County community of Nigton and living in Diboll in the 1940’s and 1950’s.  He talks about living with his grandparents in the small, tight-knit African American community founded by freed slaves after the end of the Civil War.  He discusses farming methods, raising animals, attending church and school, going to Apple Springs in a wagon, smoking meat, and making soap.  He also talks about race relations in Nigton and Diboll, discussing segregation, visits by white vigilantes, and Jay Boren’s treatment of Diboll’s African American community.  Mr. Mark mentions Willie Massey, Professor Jackson, Arthur Temple, the Ligon family, the Deason family, the Lacy family, Snuffy Harris, the Roach family, the White family, and the Womack family. 

Mark, Lottie

September 18, 2002

Interview 239a : In this interview with Robert Kuykendall and Rev. Betty Kennedy, Mrs. Lottie Mark reminisces about growing up in Nigton, Trinity County, Texas. She recalls her experiences as an African American girl in the 1920's in this primarily African American community in East Texas. Her life revolved around Ligon Chapel CME Church and school. She grew up in Nigton and later married and continued to live there for her whole life. Mrs. Mark talks about her family's struggles after her father left, going to raising a garden and chickens, going to Apple Springs to the store, and various family relationships.

Marshall, H.L. “Red”

Marshall, H.L. “Red”

February 27, 2009

Interview 177a : In this informal interview with Jonathan Gerland and Richard Donovan, Angelina County native Red Marshall reminisces about growing up in the Neches and Angelina River bottomlands before Lake Sam Rayburn and living in southern Angelina County for most of his life. He discusses raising cattle on National Forest land, hunting with dogs, pineywoods rooter hogs, feuds, moon shining, and working in sawmills. Mr. Marshall also discusses time spent as a child in oil fields.

Martindale, John

Martindale, John

January 23, 2013

Interview 255a: In this interview with Jonathan Gerland, Jasper native John Martindale reminisces about his life in East Texas.  He grew up in Jasper, attended Stephen F. Austin State University and Texas A&M, joined the Army Air Corps in World War II and returned to East Texas to work and raise his family. Mr. Martindale talks about working as a land inspector, as a drafter for highway construction, and as a land inspector and personnel manager for Kirby Lumber Company, Southwestern Settlement and Development and Temple-Eastex.  He talks about the differences between his jobs at Southwestern and after the merger with Temple, the differences in forestry practices throughout his career, and the changes in the forest products industry.  Mr. Martindale recalls negotiating land leases and hunting clubs, managing the forests and the personnel that worked the forest, and keeping his districts around Kirbyville and Silsbee free from any land disputes. 

Martin, Murphy

Martin, Murphy

May 06, 2000

Interview 156a : A 1942 graduate of Lufkin High School, Murphy Martin tells interviewer Jonathan Gerland about being an ABC-TV network anchorman and news correspondent in New York City during the 1960s. He also shares his earlier radio and television broadcasting experiences in Angelina County, including his experiences at stations KRBA and KTRE in Lufkin and KSPL in Diboll, and also relates his experiences at WFAA-TV in Dallas. Martin later served as the stadium voice of the Dallas Cowboys for twenty-four years and relates some of those experiences. Martin mentions or discusses his relationships with baseball players Pete Runnels and Mickey Mantle and football players Emmitt Smith, Michael Irving, Troy Aikman, and Roger Staubach. Martin also mentions his news coverage of civil rights stories as well as relationships with such persons as Dr. Martin Luther King, Alabama Governor George Wallace, Arthur Temple, Ross Perot, and President John F. Kennedy. A brief subject index follows the interview transcript.

Massey, Mamie Warner

March 24, 1986

Interview 96a : In this interview with Marie Davis, Angelina County native Mamie Warner Massey reminisces about life growing up in the Ryan's Chapel and Burke communities. She recalls living on her family's farm, walking to the post office and McCall store in Burke, attending school, raising and killing hogs, and raising crops.

Massey, Willie

Massey, Willie

April 22, 1986

Interview 99a : Born in Trinity County, Texas, in 1911, longtime Diboll educator Willie Massey describes how he worked his way through college and went on to teach for 39 years. He discusses life before integration of the schools, the "no pass, no play" issue, teaching in Diboll, and the effects of integration on schools and the community. Also mentioned are: Butch Davis, Freddie Randolph, Arthur Temple, Jr., Fennie Simmons, Ruby Simmons, Lily Griffin, Mattie Smith, Mr. Foster, Robert Ramsey, Lon Smith, and Walter Pate.

Mathews, Jewel Stovall

Mathews, Jewel Stovall

October 05, 1993

Interview 141a : Jewel Stovall Mathews remembers life in Alcedo, a Southern Pine Lumber Company lumber camp where she lived in a boxcar house with her family in the early 1920's. Her father ran the camp commissary, and she recalls their living conditions and the other families that lived near them. Mrs. Mathews family eventually moved to Diboll so that she and her brothers could attend school, since the Alcedo School only had six grades.

Maxwell, Harold

Maxwell, Harold

October 08, 1985

Interview 81a : Longtime Temple employee Harold Maxwell talks with Megan Lambert about his time working for the Temple companies in Diboll and Pineland. He also discusses company history, the sales department, the unfulfilled Champion Merger, the successful acquisition by Time and eventual spin-off, plywood operations in Diboll and Pineland, company morale, community spirit, and Diboll Day.

McCarty, Violet

McCarty, Violet

December 07, 1986

Interview 108a : In this interview with Jennifer Williams, Violet McCarty reminisces about life during the Great Depression. As a newlywed at the beginning of the Depression, Mrs. McCarty learned to make due and cope during the troubled financial times after her husband lost his job. They moved from Diboll back to family land in Burke, where they grew vegetables and raised livestock and cut firewood for sale to support themselves. She recalls The Cannery and all the tomatoes raised in the Burke area and all of the programs sponsored by the federal, state, and local governments to teach families how to support themselves.

McCurry, Bob

McCurry, Bob

January 01, 1973

Interview 103a : In an interview with student Terry White, Bob McCurry recalls life as a child during the Depression. He doesn't remember specific details, but does know that his father, a farmer, worked hard to provide the family with everything they needed. Mr. McCurry is unimpressed with what he sees as liberal policies that give money to those who don't work.

McGaughey, Gary

McGaughey, Gary

January 03, 1986

Interview 87a : In this interview with Becky Bailey, Gary McGaughey talks about his career with Temple-Eastex, particularly at the Fiberboard Plant. Mr. McGaughey describes the process for creating fiberboard, from the woods to the finished project. He describes the equipment and various stages the products go through on their way out of the plant.

McGlothlin, C.E

McGlothlin, C.E

January 01, 1973

Interview 103c : This is an interview about the Depression with Mr. C.E. McGlothlin, who is the educational director at the First Baptist Church here in Diboll. Kathy Saxton is the interviewer. This is a Dunlap Tape 1973.

McGlothlin, Ruth

McGlothlin, Ruth

December 10, 1986

Interview 111a : In this interview with Patricia Ordaz, Ruth McGlothlin talks about growing up and going to school in Arkansas, where her father was a superintendent during the Depression. She describes her education, her teachers, the teacher's salary, and some of the activities they did in school.

McGlothlin, Ruth

McGlothlin, Ruth

November 11, 1987

Interview 111b : In this interview with Elvia Esteves, Ruth McGlothlin describes her family life growing up in Arkansas as the daughter of a school superintendent. She talks about the Depression, about teaching, about the similarities and differences in school children now and in the past, and about her desires for the future.

Meadows, Gaston

Meadows, Gaston

March 11, 2005

Interview 165a : In this interview with Jonathan Gerland, East Texas native Gaston Meadows reminisces about his career working on the railroad. Mr. Meadows spent 41 years working for the Southern Pacific Railroad on the Houston East and West Texas line, mostly based in Lufkin. His career saw many changes in the railroad industry, and he comments particularly on the change from steam to diesel locomotives, the evolution of freight cars, the practice of piggybacking, and the evolution of train communication from very little communication to radio communication within the train to radio communication between train and station. Mr. Meadows also mentions many of his fellow railroaders, like Fred Street, B. B. Scott, Connie Nunn, and George Pouras. He also talks about the terrain and the types of trips he took between Houston and Shreveport on the HE&WT, especially mentioning the hills and spots that took extra effort to travel through.

Miller, Alan

Miller, Alan

October 19, 2007

Interview 171a : In this interview with Jonathan Gerland, long-time Temple Public Affairs director Alan Miller discusses his life and career before coming to East Texas to work for Temple and then his experiences in Diboll. He reminisces about his time in the Navy, radio-broadcasting working for the Yakima, Washington Chamber of Commerce and the American Forest Products Association and for U.S. Plywood. He discusses shutting down the town of Camden for U.S. Plywood and moving the townspeople to Corrigan using FHA housing and distributing the W.T. Carter locomotives. He then moves to talking about his twenty years at Temple, starting in 1970, and mentions Clifford Grum, Joe Denman, and Arthur Temple, Jr. He also discusses the failed U.S. Plywood merger, the successful merger with Time and Eastex and eventual spin-off. Mr. Miller's time in Public Affairs saw the new campaigns that stressed Temple's desire to be a good neighbor and have responsible forest stewardship and the necessary split between corporate and government affairs with the new complexities in environmental regulations. Mr. Miller spends a lengthy part of the interview talking about working with Arthur Temple, Jr., his treatment of this company and employees, and his visions for both.

Minton, Jewel

Minton, Jewel

December 09, 1987

Interview 120b : In this brief interview with her nephew, Daniel Webster, Jewel Minton tells about her first date, meeting and dating her husband, and her father's views on dating. She also mentions the CCC camp at Weches.

Minton, Jewel

Minton, Jewel

October 07, 1988

Interview 120a : In an interview with Marie Davis, Mrs. Jewel Minton reminisces about growing up in East Texas and living in Diboll as a married woman. Born in Weches, Mrs. Minton worked hard as a child and continued working all of her life. Her husband, Lewis Minton, worked for the Texas Southeastern Railroad and they lived in Buggerville, a railroad camp, at Rayville and Boggy Slough, and then in Diboll. She raised seven children, cooked, cleaned, sewed, washed, worked at the handle factory painting handles, and cared for the scout group. Mrs. Minton enjoyed caring for her husband, children, and children's friends and was well known throughout the area for her country breakfasts and frugal living.

Mitchell, Lewis

Mitchell, Lewis

June 21, 2010

Interview 201a : In this interview with Patsy Colbert, Diboll native Lewis Mitchell reminisces about growing up in the Red Town section and going to school in Diboll as an African American before integration. A graduate of H.G. Temple School, Mr. Mitchell particularly remembers Mr. Massey, Mr. Bradley, E.A. Gilbert, the Kenyon's, and Coach Ross as having an influence on his life. He also remembers the school integration process as an alumni, keeping in touch with his brother, Mack, and hearing the stories when he returned home from college. Mr. Mitchell also recalls working at the Housing Authority with Mr. Woodrow Woods and Margie Harrell, and was there the day the first Hispanic workers from the Texas Rio Grande Valley arrived in Diboll. He maintains that race relations were usually cordial before, during, and after integration and credits the Temple family and Southern Pine Lumber Company officials with the largely harmonious atmosphere in the town. Mr. Mitchell is active in the H.G. Temple Alumni Association and is an organizer for the Diboll Juneteenth Celebration. His father was one of the celebration's organizers, and he has continued the family tradition after returning to Diboll upon his retirement from the Rusk State Hospital.

Modisett, Cary

Modisett, Cary

May 30, 2012

Interview 252a : In this interview with Jonathan Gerland, Angelina County natives Cary Modisett and Wynn Havard reminisce about growing up along the Neches River in the middle of the 20th century. Both men speak about their homes and families, living along the river before indoor plumbing, electricity, and telephones, and the changes that took place in their community as technology advanced. They talk about fishing the river with hoop nets, moonshiners, hunting with dogs, rounding up and killing hogs, their hunting dogs, working for lumber companies, and how they amused themselves as children. Mr. Modisett and Mr. Havard mention the difficulties many of the older generations had as the lumber companies closed their land to community access and hunting and the changing game laws.

Monk, John

February 26, 2009

Interview 176a : In this interview with Jonathan Gerland, former General Manager of Texas and Louisiana Forests for Temple-Inland John Monk reminisces about his life in the forest products industry and the corporate culture at Temple. He also spends a great deal of time detailing their forest management practices and the push to become more standardized within the industry and the company. He particularly talks about Streamside Management Zones. Mr. Monk worked for Owens Illinois in Louisiana as the Forest Manager and Procurement Manager and then came to Temple when Temple bought out Owens Illinois land in 1986. He talks about the transition between the two companies and the differences in their forest management practices. Mr. Monk mentions Clifford Grum, Jack Sweeny, Jim DeCosmo, and Jim Cumbie.

Morehead, Jackie Oliver

Morehead, Jackie Oliver

January 01, 1985

Interview 89a : This transcript is from two self-interviews from sisters Johnny Oliver Gibson and Jackie Oliver Morehead. They each separately talk about their memories of growing up in Diboll and living in the Southern Pine Lumber Company town when their father was not an employee of the company. They mention their relationships with company leaders, African-American citizens, and other townspeople.

Mosely, Arverta Frazier

Mosely, Arverta Frazier

November 30, 2010

Interview 215a : In this interview with Jonathan Gerland and Richard Donovan, sisters Rose Frazier Corder, Wilhelmenia Frazier Hardy, and Arverta Frazier Mosely reminisce about their lives growing up in the southern Angelina County African American settlement of Boykin Settlement in the middle of the 20th century. They all attended the Vernon County Line School (near the Blue Hole) and then went on to have professions and higher education. Mrs. Mosely attended Prairie View College and became a teacher at Camp Nancy and then spent the rest of her career as a County Home Demonstration Agent or County Extension Agent. At first the office was segregated and she only worked with African American women, but in the 1960's and 1970's the offices were racially integrated and she taught all women to can and freeze food and other domestic skills. Mrs. Hardy moved to Houston and then Milwaukee, Wisconsin with her husband, where she attended cosmetology school and real estate school. She talks about the differences in culture and race relations in Milwaukee than in Houston and Boykin Settlement. Mrs. Corder moved to Milwaukee as a teenager to live with her sister Wilhelmenia, where she adapted to life in a school of 3000 students. She continued her education and became a nurse in Milwaukee and California, before returning to Lufkin. The Frazier sisters grew up in this African American community in a family of 13 children that all survived to adulthood. Their ancestors, the Runnels, were former slaves who settled in the area.