Exhibits

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Imagining Texas: An Historical Journey With Maps

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Joseph Ramón de Urrutia y de las Casa (1739-1803)
Plano del Presidio de Nuestra Señora del Pilar de los Adaes, capital de la provincia de los Tejas…(1767)
Pen-and-ink and watercolor manuscript, 16.5 x 21 in.

The first capital of Spanish Texas was Los Adaes, located 33 miles east of the Sabine River, near Robeline, Louisiana.  Joseph de Urrutia (1739-1803), a first lieutenant and cartographer in the Spanish army, drew this 1767 topographical rendering of Los Adaes as one of twenty-two plans of various presidios and towns he visited during the Marqués de Rubí’s inspection tour across New Spain’s northern frontier in 1766-1768.  The plan shows two adjacent hills or ridges, separated by an intermittent stream. On the northern ridge is the presidio, or fort, and on the southern ridge is the mission.  Los Adaes was the capital of Texas from 1729 to 1772.

Courtesy of the British Library, Cartographic Items, MS. 17,662.s.

  • Imagining Texas: An Historical Journey With Maps
  • Imagining Texas: An Historical Journey With Maps
  • Imagining Texas: An Historical Journey With Maps
  • Imagining Texas: An Historical Journey With Maps
  • Imagining Texas: An Historical Journey With Maps
  • Imagining Texas: An Historical Journey With Maps
  • Imagining Texas: An Historical Journey With Maps
  • Imagining Texas: An Historical Journey With Maps
  • Imagining Texas: An Historical Journey With Maps
  • Imagining Texas: An Historical Journey With Maps
  • Imagining Texas: An Historical Journey With Maps
  • Imagining Texas: An Historical Journey With Maps
  • Imagining Texas: An Historical Journey With Maps
  • Imagining Texas: An Historical Journey With Maps
  • Imagining Texas: An Historical Journey With Maps
  • Imagining Texas: An Historical Journey With Maps
  • Imagining Texas: An Historical Journey With Maps